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Davis Houck Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 01-MSS 2015-007

Scope and Contents

Newclippings, photographs, creative and scholarly works, and government records collected by Davis Houck during research on the role of the press in the American civil rights movement, with special emphasis on the 1955 murder of Emmett Till near Money, Mississippi.

Dates

  • Created: 1955 - 2006
  • Other: Majority of material found in 1955 - 1956

Creator

Conditions Governing Access

Collection is open to all researchers.

Conditions Governing Use

All requests for permission to quote, publish, broadcast or otherwise reproduce from manuscripts must be submitted in writing to the Associate Dean for Special Collections & Archives. Permission for publication is given on behalf of the Florida State University Libraries as the owner of the physical items and is not intended to include or imply permission of the copyright holder, which must also be obtained by the researcher.

Biographical or Historical Information

Dr. Davis Houck holds a Bachelors of the Arts degree in Communication from the College of Wooster, a Master’s degree in Rhetoric and Communication from the University of California, and a PhD in Speech Communication from Penn State University. He previously taught at Florida Atlantic University from 1996 to 1999.  Houck joined the faculty of the College of Communication & Information at Florida State University in 2000, and in 2016 was named Fannie Lou Hamer Professor of Rhetorical Studies.

Dr. Houck’s research interests include rhetorical criticism, presidential rhetoric, the Black Freedom Movement, historiography and archival research, and mediated representations of sport. Dr. Houck has written several papers and a book on the Emmett Till case.

Emmett Till (1941-1955) was an African American teenager who was murdered in 1955 in a racially motivated crime while visiting relatives near Money, Mississippi. Till’s murder and the subsequent trial became national news. His death demonstrated the racism present in Mississippi during the time and became a focal point for the Civil Rights Movement.

Extent

3.50 Linear Feet